Websites

Websites

Celeste Begandy > Websites

While I’m still in the baby phases of learning website creation and design, I’m off to a decent start. Working with websites can be a frustrating and time-consuming endeavor, but the results can be sweet once you finally get it to work right. Nothing is as satisfying as when the vision for a website becomes a reality through hard work, research, learning and testing. To not only possess a great site, but to create one, is an awesome and valuable asset.

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Rock, Reggae & Relief: Used as a temporary website for this Downtown music festival, rockreggaerelief.com used to be rumrockreggae.com. After the name change, I had to research on how to properly change the URL. Fortunately, it wasn’t as hard as I thought. While I’m not crazy about the theme (I had a much better one first, but alas, it was not responsive at all), it’s simple and works well.

Millcraft: While Shift Collaborative did all of the heavy lifting (e.g., the actual creation of the website), I assisted in the project management of this brand new website (e.g., creating wireframe, providing content, etc.). Long story short, the original (and awful) Millcraft site randomly decided to lose its style sheet. Shift Collaborative did a great job of creating a temporary, smaller website, and worked tirelessly to make the new website infinitely better. I’m extremely happy with how this website turned out, and it’s especially easy to update and add additional content.

What I learned from this project? The scope is always bigger than you may think — 10 pages quickly turns into 20 portfolio pages, and two months of developing turns into nine. It’s important to truly understand the vision of your site, and convey that to the developer from the get-go.

Lumière: Another great website from Shift Collaborative, I helped again with the commission and project management of this site. They went above and beyond to understand the style of this project, which was very difficult with a plain logo, renders, and a first-phase brochure to go off of. In addition, they created a great custom post type for units, so people can search available homes based on bedrooms, views, or sort by price or floor plan. I can easily update elements of this WordPress site as needed.

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SOS Animal Rescue: My first pro bono work, this site was for a cat rescue in Jeannette, PA. I worked hard to change CSS styles and colors. I also had to find ways to simply sync information so the organizer wouldn’t have to log on for every update, such as cat profiles and events. Read my blog post about this site here!

River View Ridge Condominiums: While it’s just WordPress, I’m still proud of my work on this site. I chose the theme and relentlessly tweaked it over a few days — the logo needed to replace the header text, the Facebook logo needed shifted to the other side, the fonts needed embedded. Some of these battles I lost, but most I won by digging through WordPress help forums. I completed this website on my own, including WordPress set up, theme installation and edits, copy writing, organization and SEO. The logos and photos were commissioned.

SavvyREAgent (now defunct): I didn’t create this WordPress-powered site myself, but as a part of my duties at SavvyREAgent, I help maintain it. I update and place listings, write blog posts and add certain features or widgets. I troubleshoot and research  to accomplish what Racheallee wants to do.

Oddventures (now defunct): This website served as my class’ multimedia Capstone. Our class of 14 people tried out unique hobbies around Pittsburgh to create multimedia content and compile a somewhat evergreen website. I served as the class’ administrator, so my duties included troubleshooting, processing requests and style consistency. I also contributed the site idea itself (not that I’m taking all of the credit), as well as to the lock picking and sword fighting sections. It may have been the most fun and cooperative group project I’ve ever worked on.

 

Web Publishing site: While this class was an instructional train wreck, I still managed to complete a basic yet working site entirely from HTML and CSS (with a little help from jQuery), using Dreamweaver, Photoshop and Illustrator. I did learn quite a bit from the more capable instructions of the Internet, and I hope to apply what I learned to my WordPress side.